Need a title - what are we calling this? Resources. Michelle's Tips. Yes You Chien Help Zone. Doggie Aid Files?? Even if you're not sure add/delete some ideas here while you flesh it out.

Also need a little intro here.

I liked the way you described it to me that you personally experienced a number of these issues with your dogs and had to research what to do and realized you wanted to create a place where fellow doggie owners could find the info they needed and maybe learn about other things that might help them in the future…. but in your words.

Roaming Reptiles

Snakes

Most snakes in France are entirely harmless and only one person in 10 years dies because of venom from a snake bite. Snakes will normally go to great lengths to avoid humans and other animals and will usually only bite if disturbed unexpectedly or if injured. Even with that, the maximum strike range of a snake is about one half of its body length, so you or your dog would be extremely unlucky to be struck by a snake and with that a poisonous one.

Show a little caution when moving objects, or putting your hand into places, that could be possible hiding places for a snake, such as log piles or water meter boxes.

Approximately 80% of pets survive a snake bite if treated quickly, so a prompt response is essential.

French word for snake is SERPENT

Recognize the Symptoms

  • Trembling, shaking or twitching of muscles
  • Diarrhea and/or vomiting
  • Unsteadiness/weakness in hind legs
  • Excessive salivation, drooling or frothing at the mouth
  • Bloody urine
  • Dilated pupils
  • Paralysis
  • Evidence of bite wounds and pain/swelling around a bite site. In many cases, there may be minimal pain and swelling so this isn’t the most reliable way of determining whether your pet got bitten or not — you still have to watch for the other signs.

Urgent veterinary assistance should be sought.

Call the clinic ahead of your arrival so that the team can make the necessary preparations to treat your pet as soon as you arrive.
Important: You will probably be asked to identify the snake, but do not attempt to catch or kill it.

https://vetsoftherockies.com/education/how-to-treat-a-snake-bite-on-a-dog/

Prevention:
If you hear toads croaking when your dogs are outside at night, it is best to keep your dog on a lead. Be vigilant and if you see any of the signs of your dog in distress as above, call a vet immediately.

Information reference: Veterostrenen

Toads

There are several species of toads in France, including the common toad and the natterjack Toad. Unfortunately, they are all toxic to animals who lick the powerful secretions on their skin.

As they have very little need for water except when breeding or laying eggs, they can often be found in dry areas, such as gardens, bushes, forests, and up mountains even at 3000m for some species. They are active mainly at night and can often be heard with their characteristic vocals.

The powerful toxins secreted from the skin can cause symptoms in just a few minutes including kidney issues, stress, breathing difficulties and increased heart rate.

French word for toad is ‘CRAPAUD’ pronounced CRA-POH

Recognise the symptoms:
If your dog suddenly starts

  • vomiting
  • having diarrhoea
  • convulsing
  • salivating
  • licking carpets or furniture
  • rubbing its face
  • is disorientated

these could all be signs of licking a toad.

Urgent veterinary assistance should be sought.

The vet will no doubt rinse the mouth and nose and administer anti histamines, anti-convulsant plus other treatments. Eye care may also be necessary.

Prevention:
If you hear toads croaking when your dogs are outside at night, it is best to keep your dog on a lead. Be vigilant and if you see any of the signs of your dog in distress as above, call a vet immediately.

Information reference: Veterostrenen

French Names for Dog Body Parts

When French isn’t our first language, that’s difficult enough, but in an emergency when you are worried about your dog, its SO difficult, on the phone, trying to tell the vets the symptoms you are seeing your dog exhibit. 

This diagram posted on Facebook by Brave New Dog is excellent – keep it handy, or better still, try and learn some of the more common used dog body parts. 

Common handy sentences for use with the vet:

My dog is very ill
– Mon chien est très malade

He is limping and I think he has damaged his leg.
– Il boite et je pense qu’il s’est abîmé la patte.

He is not eating and is very tired.
– Il ne mange pas et est très fatigué

My dog has a problem with his —- (INSERT BODY PART).
– Mon chien a un problème avec son —- (INSÉRER UNE PARTIE DU CORPS)

I think my dog has been stung in the mouth.
– Je pense que mon chien s’est fait piquer dans la gueule.

My dog is shaking his head a lot and I think he has a problem with his ear.
– Mon chien secoue beaucoup la tête et je pense qu’il a un problème à l’oreille.

 

Please – if you have any other useful phrases, please message me and I will add them to this information.

Information reference:

https://www.bravenewdog/

Stay at Home Seniors

Yes You Chien has been grooming dogs for over 3 years now and many of my gorgeous four legged clients are in their senior years. So I’m launching a new offering :

 

For those elderly dogs who now find it difficult travelling in the car, or who are just not up to the “full bath, dry and groom”, I will come to them at their home. My aim is to focus on the dogs comfort and the Stay at Home Senior Sessions will include:

  • removal of  excess undercoat hair if they are still up to being gently brushed
  • clipping painful overgrown nails and matted hard hair in their paw beds
  • reducing and removing hair from sanitary areas enabling them to keep themselves cleaner
  • removing painful knots and mats behind ears, between legs and on belly.

The price of each visit will be after a discussion with me so that I understand more about your dog. Travel costs and time will be charged as part of this offering. 

Information reference:

https://www.bravenewdog/

Poisonous Portions for Dogs

Alcohol

Dogs are affected more strongly than humans by alcohol. Your dogs liver, stomach and kidneys can be badly damaged by alcohol.

Caffeine

The caffeine in coffee and tea is a  stimulant and can make dogs anxious, hyperactive, and affect their heart. Too much can even cause collapse or a seizure. 

Chocolate

A BIG no-no is chocolate. It contains theobromine – a substance similar to caffeine that’s poisonous for dogs.

Xylitol

Sugar is generally bad for dogs, so dont give them human biscuits, cakes or sweets. Xylitol is a common artificial sweetener, and is toxic for dogs – it’s often in things you wouldn’t expect (like peanut butter).

Most nuts

Avoid giving your dog any type of nut. Most nuts can leave your dog very poorly – and macadamia nuts are particularly dangerous, as they can cause vomiting, fever, and muscle weakness.

Apple pips

Apple pips contain cyanide – so ditch the core, and serve tasty pip-free slices instead.

Milk and cheese

Dogs can’t digest lactose properly, so it’s best to avoid feeding them milk, cheese, or any other high-lactose dairy products.

Blue cheese

Blue cheese can be especially dangerous. It releases roquefortine C – a toxin that, in severe cases, can cause tremors and seizures.

Grapes, raisins, and currants

These are all highly toxic, causing serious problems – including kidney failure. If your dog gets hold of these, it’s best to get them to the vet quickly.

Onions, garlic, and leeks

These all contain thiosulphate which causes gastrointestinal problems and severe anemia. Lots of dishes contain any one of these, so keep anything risky out of reach.

Avocado

This brunch staple contains persin – a chemical that can upset your dog’s stomach. 

Shellfish

Many types of fish are fine for dogs, however,  shellfish like crab, prawns, and crayfish contain pathogens that can make your dog very unwell. Shellfish also has high levels of an amino acid called histidine, which can cause an allergic reaction.

Bones

Cooked bones are brittle, meaning pieces can break off and get stuck in your dog’s throat or digestive system. Raw bones must be stored properly, as they can carry nasty bacteria that will upset your dog’s stomach

Be vigilant when your dog is around human food and drink. Never leave any food unattended or within reach, which could cause illness to your dog.

Information reference: 

tails.com

Dog Days - Calendar dates to celebrate living with your dog

Alcohol

Alcohol affects dogs more intensely than humans and is really damaging to lots of your dog’s organs – including the kidneys, liver, and stomach. Be extra careful if sweet alcoholic drinks are around, as the sugar can cover up the alcohol flavour that normally puts dogs off.

Chocolate

Another big no-no is chocolate. It contains theobromine – a substance similar to caffeine that’s poisonous for dogs. Dark chocolate can be especially dangerous as it contains much more theobromine than regular milk choc.

Caffeine

Coffee (and tea) is a stimulant – it can make dogs anxious, hyperactive, and affect their heart. It can even cause them to collapse or have a seizure if they have too much. It’s best to keep that morning brew out of reach.

Apple pips

Apple pips contain cyanide – so ditch the core, and serve tasty pip-free slices instead.

Blue cheese

Dairy is best avoided altogether, but blue cheese can be especially dangerous. It releases roquefortine C – a toxin that, in severe cases, can cause tremors and seizures.

Grapes, raisins, and currants

These are all highly toxic, causing serious problems – including kidney failure. If your dog gets hold of these, it’s best to get them to the vet quickly.

Onions, garlic, and leeks

These all contain thiosulphate which causes gastrointestinal problems and severe anemia. Lots of dishes contain any one of these, so keep anything risky out of reach.

Xylitol

A common artificial sweetener, xylitol is toxic for dogs – and it’s often in things you wouldn’t expect (like peanut butter).

Avocado

This brunch staple contains persin – a chemical that can upset your dog’s stomach. 

Milk and cheese

Dogs can’t digest lactose properly, so it’s best to avoid feeding them milk, cheese, or any other high-lactose dairy products.

Shellfish

See what fish is fine here  – but shellfish like crab, prawns, and crayfish contain pathogens that can make your dog very unwell. Shellfish also has high levels of an amino acid called histidine, which can cause an allergic reaction.

Most nuts

When it comes to nuts, avoid everything except xylitol-free peanut butter. Most nuts can leave your dog very poorly – and macadamia nuts are particularly dangerous, as they can cause vomiting, fever, and muscle weakness.

Bones

Cooked bones are brittle, meaning pieces can break off and get stuck in your dog’s throat or digestive system. Raw bones must be stored properly, as they can carry nasty bacteria that will upset your dog’s stomach.

Information reference:

Savage Summer Seeds

This season, the summer seeds seem to be causing more havoc than usual with both my dogs and my clients dogs. In just a few weeks, both Daphne and Dexter have been to the vets, her with a seed up into her “private parts” and him with a horrible seed which had perforated his ear drum. To top it all I’ve just found a horrid spiky seed in Daphnes eye – stuck right up inside her upper eyelid.

Dogs with hairy pendulus ears such as Cocker Spaniels, Springer Spaniels and Cockapoos are more prone to problems with seeds inside their ear canals.